Make This Homemade Fishing Lure

By Joseph Truini
Illustrated by David J. Brooks

Snag the big one by making this DIY fishing lure.

WHAT YOU’LL NEED

  • Inexpensive thin stainless-steel teaspoon or tablespoon (usually found at a thrift store)
  • Vise
  • Hacksaw
  • Hammer
  • Center punch
  • Drill
  • Drill bit
  • Flat metal file
  • Medium-grit emery cloth
  • Needle nose pliers
  • Kitchen cleanser
  • Toothpaste
  • Two split rings
  • Swivel (to keep your line from twisting)
  • Treble hook
  • Two pieces of wood

WHAT YOU’LL DO

1. Place the spoon in the vise horizontally between two pieces of wood. The wood will soften the grip on the spoon and prevent scratches.

2. Cut a notch in the spoon with the hacksaw.

3. Reposition the spoon vertically in the vise and move handle back and forth until it breaks away.

4. Mark the position of the holes by hammering indents with the center punch.

5. Place the spoon in the vise, concave side up, and drill the two holes.

6. Reposition the spoon vertically in the vise and file it to shape. With the emery cloth, sand off any rough edges until the spoon is smooth.

7. Polish the spoon with kitchen cleaner, then with tooth paste.

8. With the needle nose pliers, attach the split rings, swivel and hook. Your fishing lure is complete.

PHOTOS OF COMPLETED PROJECT

Check out these photos of the completed project sent to us by Boys’ Life readers. If you have a photos of a BL Workshop project, please send them to us.

WHEN IS IT TIME TO CHANGE YOUR FISHING LINE?

Your fishing line is the only thing between you and the fish. Slide your fingers along the line. If you can feel rough spots, you should replace it. If the line comes off the reel in coils, it’s probably time to replace it.

KEEP YOUR HOOKS SHARP

Drag the point of the hook across your thumb nail. A sharp hook point should lightly scratch your thumb nail.

Joseph Truini is a home-improvement expert who writes extensively about do-it-yourself home remodeling and repair, woodworking projects, and tools and techniques. He has authored six books and his work has appeared in several national magazines, including This Old House, Popular Mechanics, Woman’s Day and Today’s Homeowner. He just started his 14th season as segment host of Simple Solutions for the nationally syndicated TV show “Today’s Homeowner with Danny Lipford.” Joe also writes articles for Home Depot, who stocks rotary tools and other tools and materials needed for projects like this one.

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